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Gas Station Under Fire Ends in SWAT Team Response

Gas Station Under Fire Ends in SWAT Team Response

swat team

Shooting at Gas Station Triggers SWAT Team Response

In a report from KVUE, a gas station on the East Side of Austin was fired upon and the incident led to the deployment of the Austin Police Department’s SWAT team on Monday, March 13th.

According to APD, at 5:32 p.m., police were called out to a Valero gas station located at 3112 East Cesar Chavez Street where the gunshots were fired. A woman called 911 and told them several gunshots had been fired at her and that the assailants had fled the area in a vehicle.

No one was harmed in the shooting and officers were able to find the vehicle described by the woman in the 2600 block of East 4th Street. Police thought that the people involved in the gas station shooting were barricaded inside a nearby house and APD’s SWAT team was called to the scene.

There were no occupants in the home and officers questioned one person at the scene. There was no information as to whether that person was involved in the gas station shooting.

 

Fiery Situation

The situation with the SWAT team could have gone wrong in so many ways. What if it was the wrong house and they broke down the door with guns blazing? What if there were children involved? The variables in a scenario like this one are numerous and, as with anything that requires people to coordinate, there is a chance for human error.

 

Workplace injuries

Let us turn our attention to the gas station attendant that was working that night. It probably isn’t very fun to have the business where you are employed to be shot up while you are working. According to The Washington Post, the homicide rate of cashiers is 1 out of 100,000 full-time workers. This places cashiers as the 5th most likely job for a person to be murdered while working. The dubious honor of 1st, 2nd, and 3rd places in this category go to taxi drivers with an 8 out of 100,000 homicide rate, police or sheriff’s patrol officers with a homicide rate of 3.5 out of 100,000, and food service managers with an almost 2 out of 100,000 rate.

 

Working at a job should be a safe experience, and just because you know there is an inherent danger in your line of work doesn’t excuse your employers from trying their best to provide you with the safest work environment possible. If you feel like you have been injured because your employer dropped the ball in providing a relatively safe workplace, contact us and we will evaluate your case at no cost to you.