Texas Tech Shooter Did Not Use the Policeman’s Gun

 

According to a report by NBC DFW, the 19-year-old Texas Tech University student who is charged in connection with the murder of a Tech Campus Police officer did not use a police issued gun in the shooting. This news was told by an official spokesperson for Texas Tech. It turns out that the weapon that Hollis Daniels used to shoot Officer Floyd East Jr. was a stolen firearm. On Monday, October 9th, officers received several complaints that evening of a student acting erratically and possibly in possession of a weapon. Officer East responded to the complaints and did a welfare check. During the check, he found evidence of drugs and other drug paraphernalia in the room of Daniels.

Daniels was then taken to the police station where he produced his weapon and shot East, killing him. Daniels fled the station after shooting the police officer. Daniels was not handcuffed while he was being processed, according to police reports. After hearing a loud bang, another officer who had left the room returned and found East had been mortally wounded. Daniels was gone, and East’s body camera was missing. However, his service weapon was still holstered. Daniels was later arrested after the campus was locked down and searched.

In an affidavit released Tuesday, Det. Thomas Bonds of the Lubbock city police department said Daniels confessed to killing East after his recapture Monday night, telling detectives he had done “something illogical” and that “he was the one that shot their friend.”

Daniels had some previous run-ins with the law and is now also being charged with capital murder of a police officer.

Workplace Violence and Injury

Police officers have a dangerous job that entails a high chance of seeing some violence in the line of duty. Most police officers understand that their job has some inherent dangers that come with putting on a badge. Other jobs can have dangers that employers were not forthright about and the effects of exposure to these dangers may not manifest themselves for decades. For instance, people who used to work with asbestos can find themselves in a hard-fought battle for their lives due to being exposed unaware to this dangerous substance. Other jobs also come with their own dangers, as well. Jobs in the oilfields and construction yards have their fair share of dangers in the form of heavy machinery, power tools, and exposure to the elements. In the end, getting hurt on the job can change your life in a drastic way.

2015 Work Injury Statistics

According to U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics reports:

 

  • The annual total of 4,836 fatal workplace injuries in 2015, was the highest number since 5,214 fatal injuries in 2008.
  • A total of 4,836 fatal work injuries were recorded in the United States in 2015, a slight increase from the 4,821 fatal injuries reported in 2014.
  • Workers age 65 years and older incurred 650 fatal injuries, the second-largest number for the group since the national census began in 1992 but decreased from the 2014 figure of 684.
  • Fatal injuries in the private oil and gas extraction industries were 38 percent lower in 2015 than 2014.
  • Seventeen percent of decedents were contracted by and performing work for another business or government entity in 2015 rather than for their direct employer at the time of the incident.
  • Heavy and tractor-trailer truck drivers recorded 745 fatal injuries, the most of any occupation.
  • The 937 fatal work injuries in the private construction industry in 2015 represented the highest total since 975 cases in 2008.

San Antonio Job Injury Lawyers

If you have been hurt on the job, depending on the extent of your injury, you could be in for a long road to recovery. Let us help you get to the end of that road. Contact us if you or a family member had been injured or has lost their lives in a work-related accident. We can set up an opportunity for you to speak to a member of our team regarding the details of your accident. The initial consultation is free, so there is no risk involved in contacting us.